FBI said to have stalked Ivins' family

Before killing himself last week, Army scientist Bruce Ivins told friends that government agents had stalked him and his family for months, offered his son $2.5 million to rat him out and tried to turn his hospitalized daughter against him with photographs of dead anthrax victims.

The pressure on Ivins was extreme, a high-risk strategy that has failed the FBI before. The government was determined to find the villain in the 2001 anthrax attacks; it was too many years without a solution to the case that shocked and terrified a post-9/11 nation.

The last thing the FBI needed was another embarrassment.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Well, they have one, because the whole world knows that while the FBI pounded on Drs. Ayaad Asaad, Stephen Hatfill, Bruce Ivins, etc. they totally avoided the one man actually caught on the security system entering the lab where the anthrax used in the letters was kept, without authorization and after losing his job over a racially-motivated attack on the aforesaid Dr. Asaad.

GREAT MOMENTS IN THE HISTORY OF THE FBI.

"[Your information is] too precise, too complete to be believed. The questionnaire plus the other information you brought spell out in detail exactly where, when, how, and by whom we are to be attacked. If anything, it sounds like a trap."

FBI response to the top British spy, Dusko Popov (code named "Tricycle") on August 10, 1941, dismissing Popov's report of the complete Japanese plan for the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Pearl Harbor: The Verdict Of History by Gordon Prange, appendix 7 published in 1986. Based on records from the JOINT CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack, Nov 15, 1945 to May 31, 1946.

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