Climategate inquiry glosses over the facts

The tone of the Climategate inquiries was set by Britain's parliamentary inquiry. With an election looming, the parliamentary committee could only hold one day of hearings, and found that the scientists involved had not attempted to mislead people.

Yet the hearings did not include testimony from the most severe critics of the hockey stick graphic, such as Canadians Steve McIntyre and Ross McKitrick, who could have explained exactly why the e-mails did suggest impropriety.

The parliamentary inquiry was also assured by the UEA that the quality of the science would be reviewed by another inquiry to be headed by Lord Oxburgh. Yet Lord Oxburgh's panel handed down a short report which did not examine the quality of the science at all.

The panel simply reviewed a selection of CRU papers -- selected by the UEA itself -- and pronounced itself satisfied that the scientific process was fair and proper. The chairman of the parliamentary committee, Labor legislator Phil Willis, told the BBC he "could not believe" this "sleight of hand."

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