Moves, Rhetoric Reveal Massive US Commitment to Afghanistan War | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Moves, Rhetoric Reveal Massive US Commitment to Afghanistan War

Visiting the Netherlands today, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates sought to use a visit to World War II era graves as a chance to press the nation’s NATO allies to observe World War II style unity in the conflict. Much of NATO has refused to commit additional troops to the seemingly endless war, despite administration pressures.

But the most telling aspect is the enormous collection of officers being picked by new US commander Lieutenant General McChrystal for the conflict. The 400-strong team will be committed to the war in Afghanistan for at least three more years, which is probably time for the administration to have to unveil at least two new major strategy changes given the war’s recent history.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Memo to SecDef Gates, who appears to like to invoke history, but has absolutely no understanding of it: this military invasion and subsequent occupation of Afghanistan has absolutely no relationship to the events of World War II. Invoking this is a really gross error in judgment.

The US and NATO are attempting, with a far smaller contingent than the Old Soviet Union used (around 500,000 pairs of boots on the ground), to conquer this country militarily. The old USSR failed catastrophically in this endeavor: the US will, unfortunately, probably do the same.

We are not in Afghanistan to bring it's people "freedom and democracy"; we are in Afghanistan for the reasons reported in:

http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2009/05/obamas-problem-with-gas.html

Which ran a story on 17 May , 2009, from which the following excerpts are taken:

"The Afghan War is about energy, heroin and military bases.

The USA would like to control the energy-rich former Soviet republics.

The USA wants to split Russia and China.

Afghanistan occupies a strategically important position.

Afghanistan is believed to be rich in natural gas, petroleum, coal, copper, chrome, talc, barites, sulfur, lead, zinc, and iron ore.

The heroin trade in Afghanistan uses U.S. dollars."

So, there you have it.

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