Hoyer hints support for Afghanistan is slipping

The majority leader has been one of the most ardent supporters of President Barack Obama's handling of the war on terror and military campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq, but he noted things haven’t gone as smoothly as the party had hoped.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Memo to Steny Hoyer: there is no support whatsoever on the part of the American people for this war in Afghanistan.

And Senator, please understand: thinking Americans have already had their moment of clarity about current US military misadventures around the planet, including Iraq and Afghanistan.

The understand that what has been going on here is not a "war on terror", but a war on people sitting over geostrategically placed hunks of real estate with resources, or transport routes to and from those resources, which the US government wishes to claim for its own.

In Iraq, the issue was oil, and who was going to control it. After completely destroying the country's infrastructure, generating internecine civil war between Sunni and Shiite Muslims, and showering the place with depleted uranium, the US still has no control of Iraq's vast oil wealth.

As reported Dec 14, 2009 at:

http://news.antiwar.com/2009/12/14/despite-sense-of-entitlement-us-companies-lose-iraq-oil-auctions/

"Despite Sense of Entitlement, US Companies Lose Iraq Oil Auctions"

In October, oil billionaire T. Boone Pickens expressed annoyance at the fact that US oil corporations were being asked to compete with foreign companies for oil contracts in Iraq.

“They’re opening them up to other companies all over the world… we’re entitled to it,” Pickens insisted, warning that after six plus years of American occupation “we leave there with the Chinese getting the oil.”

And who now actually looks like they're going to be developing a lion's share of Iraqi oil?

As reported on 27 April, 2010 at:

http://www.investorsiraq.com/showthread.php?143163-Iraq-oil-development-swift-despite-politics&s=1d081417dc504212ef891c21f1129fb5&p=1000499#post1000499

The major oil companies are starting to move forward at a very high speed. Oil companies are tendering huge contracts and making commitments in the market," said Kjetil Tonstad, Statoil's vice-president for International Exploration and Production, Middle East. "Execution is going full speed ahead despite the political situation."

"Norway's Statoil and Russian partner LUKOIL would increase output to 120,000 barrels per day (bpd) at Iraq's West Qurna phase two oilfield in 2012, Tonstad said. That was the level set by Iraq for first commercial production at the field.
The consortium has already started issuing tenders for work at the field, he said. He declined to give further details.
Lukoil and Statoil sealed the 20-year deal to develop the West Qurna Phase Two, a 12.9 billion barrel oilfield in the south, in an auction in December."

And what about Afghanistan? The invasion and occupation of Afghanistan had two outcomes which were desired by both the Bush And Obama administrations. The first (completely unfulfilled, nearly 9 years on) was the "pacification" of the Afghan people in order to install the pipeline routes with which to control Eurasian oil.

Karzai, corrupt thug that he is (but no idiot) is talking about reconciling with the Taliban to begin a tentative peace process. The Taliban want US and NATO troops out now. So, we are left, 9 years on, at the point where we are ultimately going to have to negotiate with whatever government is left standing in Kabul for the oil pipeline rights, just as the Bush administration was attempting - unsuccessfully - as late as August of 2001.

The Bush administration thought the Taliban government's asking price was "too high", but, to their way of thinking, an invasion and occupation's price, in blood and money, was not.

The second outcome, which can absolutely be characterized as "mission accomplished" is control of the drug trade, which the Taliban had almost completely exterminated. In fact, that bit has gone so magnificently well that Russia is publicly complaining about the cheap Afghan opium, flooding their streets, and addicting their kids. And when drug production is controlled, where the drugs wind up is also controlled. Pouring cheap drug into a country a method of destabilizing that country without firing a shot.

So in conclusion, Senator: pull the funding for these immoral, illegal wars, bring our troops home, and treat them the respect, practical necessities, and excellent medical services they deserve for having risked life and limb not for the security of their country, but ultimately for private oil or drug profits.

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