Drug company used ghost writers to author work bylined by academics, documents show

According to newly released documents from GlaxoSmithKline, the pharmaceutical company often paid ghostwriters to pen medical studies, editorials and even a textbook that listed physicians as the authors.

The documents—some of which date back to late 1990s—were recently unsealed in litigation over a GlaxoSmithKline product. We saw them after they were attached to a letter released this week by a nonprofit watchdog group urging the National Institutes of Health to crack down on ghostwriting in medical academia. The documents and the letter by Project on Government Oversight together outline several examples of how a major drug company contributed to the funding, writing and approval of material published in medical journals and elsewhere.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Unflipping believable, but this clearly demonstrates how the drug companies have acted to skirt regulations in such a way that everyone, from physician to patient, is convinced that prescription drugs are both safe and efficacious.

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